Sunday, April 22, 2018

New Colorado law will require truckers to take trafficking training


Monday, April 16, 2018
by THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Colorado police and advocacy groups say they hope more trained eyes on the road will help stop sex and labor trafficking. The trucking industry supported the bill.
Colorado police and advocacy groups say they hope more trained eyes on the road will help stop sex and labor trafficking. The trucking industry supported the bill.

DENVER — A new law in Colorado will require truck drivers to complete a class on how to recognize and prevent human trafficking.

Gov. John Hickenlooper signed the measure into law Thursday.

The Denver Post reports the bill had broad, bipartisan support.

It will require people seeking a new commercial driver's license to complete the half-hour training at no extra cost.

Police and advocacy groups say they hope more trained eyes on the road will help stop sex and labor trafficking. The trucking industry supported the bill.

“It just heightens awareness, and it shows you how you can be part of the solution,” said Sen. Rachel Zenzinger, D-Arvada, one of the bill’s sponsors.

The bill passed the Colorado legislature with limited opposition.

The law goes into effect this summer.

Arkansas is one of those states.

State Police Spokesman Bill Sadler said the state is not administering a course, but drivers applying for a CDL will be required to have documentation that they have passed a course.

Truckers Against Trafficking offers a free online certification course for truckers and will provide evidence of completion to the state.

To meet the requirement through Truckers Against Trafficking’s online course, drivers need to watch a 26-minute video, then complete a 15-question quiz to become certified.

Once the driver is certified, TAT will send evidence of completion to the Arkansas Department of Finance and Administration.

“The course is geared to make commercial drivers to be aware of human trafficking, look for the tell-tale signs of individuals who may be with other drivers or around truck stops who may be victims of human trafficking,” Sadler said.

 

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