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HELP Inc. changes name to PrePass Safety Alliance

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The new name better reflects the core mission and structure of the non-profit public/private partnership, according to CEO Karen Rasmussen. (Courtesy: PREPASS SAFETY ALLIANCE)

PHOENIX — HELP Inc., the provider of PrePass services, has changed its name to PrePass Safety Alliance.

The new name better reflects the core mission and structure of the non-profit public/private partnership, according to CEO Karen Rasmussen.

“Over more than a quarter-century, PrePass has become one of the most-recognized and trusted brands in the commercial trucking industry and with the agencies responsible for ensuring highway safety and protecting the infrastructure,” Rasmussen said. “As the organization grew geographically and technologically,  HELP’s board of directors determined it was time to adopt a name that reflected our commitment to highway safety and efficiency, as well as our unique public/private partnership.”

HELP Inc. was chartered as a non-profit 501(c)(3) organization in 1993 following a multi-state, truck safety demonstration program to evaluate how best to pre-screen and weigh qualified, safe commercial vehicles at highway speeds and allow them to bypass weigh facilities. As an objective third-party entity,

HELP was structured to ensure that the operation of the bypass system was balanced between safety and efficiency, and that carriers allowed to bypass were selected on the basis of strict adherence to standards of safety and compliance.

The HELP name was an acronym for “Heavy-vehicle Electronic License Plate, Incorporated,” a term that loosely described the original transponders affixed near the license plates on the front of truck tractors and used for weigh station bypass in the early days of the program.

While the original transponders soon moved into the truck cab, the name remained the same for over 26 years.

Today, PrePass Safety Alliance continues to be comprised of member jurisdictions and governed by a board of directors made up equally of public sector and industry representatives.

Rasmussen said these representatives provide oversight and strategic direction for the PrePass program and related safety services.

The Alliance’s collaborative, non-profit approach is often cited as a model of how industry and government can work in partnership to improve highway safety, she said.

The new name and accompanying logo apply to PrePass Safety Alliance only.

The PrePass family of products and services, including the PrePass electronic bypass program and transponder, the PrePass Plus toll payment service, PrePass MOTION bypass app, ALERTS, PrePass ELD and the INFORM suite of data analysis products will retain their individual names and logos.

For more information, visit www.prepass.com to learn more about PrePass products and services.

 

 

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Courtesy: Transport For NSW

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