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March used truck sales down 14% from last year

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ACT Research Vice President Steve Tam said slowing growth in the freight market is also a likely contributor to the lower sales of used trucks. (Courtesy: ACT RESEARCH)

COLUMBUS, Ind. — Preliminary used Class 8 volumes (same dealer sales) jumped 25% month-over-month in March, following a modest decline in February, according to the latest preliminary release of the State of the Industry: U.S. Classes 3-8 Used Trucks published by ACT Research. However, the report indicated that longer-term comparisons yielded a 14% decline compared to March 2018.

Other data released in ACT’s preliminary report included year-over-year comparisons for March 2019, which showed that average prices rose 7%, while average miles contracted 2%, and average age was 8% higher.

“We continue to hear from dealers that the lack of inventory is a limiting factor inhibiting sales volumes, an observation corroborated by the current demand and pricing environment,” said Steve Tam, vice president at ACT Research. “Despite the impressive sequential increase, volumes remain well below last year’s year-to-date level. It is important to note that slowing growth in the freight market is also a likely contributor to the lower sales. Truckers may be getting to the point where they have the trucks necessary to meet their needed freight demand.”

ACT’s Classes 3-8 Used Truck Report provides data on the average selling price, miles, and age based on a sample of industry data. In addition, the report provides the average selling price for top-selling Class 8 models for each of the major truck OEMs – Freightliner (Daimler); Kenworth and Peterbilt (Paccar); International (Navistar); and Volvo and Mack (Volvo).

ACT Research is a publisher of commercial vehicle truck, trailer, and bus industry data, market analysis and forecasting services for the North American and China markets. ACT’s analytical services are used by all major North American truck and trailer manufacturers and their suppliers, as well as banking and investment companies.

More information can be found at www.actresearch.net.

 

 

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Business

Trailer orders down in May; June seen as pivotal month

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An FTR executive said trailer orders should rise in June as OEMs begin taking orders for 2020, adding that June orders will be a good indication of how the larger fleets view the freight market for next year. (Courtesy: GREAT DANE) 

The two companies that collect, analyze and publish data pertaining to the commercial vehicle market reported what might be called a significant decline in trailer orders for May.

FTR reported preliminary orders for 11,700 units, the lowest total since May 2016.

ACT Research reported preliminary new U.S. trailer orders of 15,500, down 16% month-over-month, but after accounting for cancellations, said net orders slid to 10.5k units, down 28% from April.

FTR said orders for 2019 production have basically come to a halt, as most build slots for the year are already filled.  Trailer builds were hefty for the third straight month and should remain elevated in the short-term.

However, production numbers in the second half will likely moderate due to expected slower economic and freight growth. The flatbed segment is already showing signs of weakening due to easing in manufacturing and industrial activity.  Trailers orders for the past 12 months now total 356,000 units.

“Orders should rise in June as OEMs begin taking orders for 2020,” said Don Ake, FTR vice president of commercial vehicles. “June orders will be a good indication of how the larger fleets view the freight market for next year.  Carriers may be cautious as long as the tariff situation is disrupting freight flows and creating significant business uncertainty.”

ACT Research said year-to-date, net orders are 40% below last year, according to this month’s issue of ACT Research’s State of the Industry: U.S. Trailer Report. Near-record backlogs have filled 2019 build slots for many OEMs, and there continues to be resistance toward booking orders into next year, resulting in the order volume contraction.

“We’re now running into very difficult year-over-year comparisons, as OEMs are generally unwilling to accept orders for 2020,” said Frank Maly, director–CV Transportation analysis and research. “We hear that some OEMs may open their 2020 orderboards in June; if so, expect better comparisons in the months ahead.

“However, given market pressures of strong capacity growth in the face of a slowing economy and tariff uncertainties, the anticipated order surge may not be as robust as many may assume.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Average price of gallon of diesel down 2.7 cents to $3.043

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The average price for the week ending June 24 is 17.3 cents a gallon lower than the same period a year ago. (The Trucker file photo)

WASHINGTON —  The average on-highway price of a gallon of diesel dropped 2.7 cents a gallon to $3.043 for the week ending June 24, according to the Energy Information Administration of the Department of Energy.

Since the week ending May 27, the price has dropped 12 cents a gallon.

All regions of the country declined, led by a 4.2 cents a gallon drop in the Rocky Mountain states (Colorado, Utah, Wyoming, Idaho and Montana) and a 3.8 cents a gallon decline in California, where the average price is still the highest in the country at $3.968 a gallon.

The lowest average price is in the Gulf Coast states (New Mexico, Texas, Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi and Alabama).

For a complete list of prices by region for the past three weeks, click here.

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Barr-Nunn creates new solo fleets, increased pay

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Barr-Nunn Transportation also offers an over-the road North fleet for those drivers living in West Virginia, Detroit, along with parts of Indiana, Wisconsin, and Iowa. (Courtesy: BARR-NUNN TRANSPORTATION)

GRANGER, Iowa — Barr-Nunn Transportation has created new solo fleets and increased pay.

For drivers living in the northeastern United States, Ohio and some of Indiana and Kentucky there are now two options for home time.

Drivers can be home every weekend for two days and earn a maximum starting pay of 60 cents per practical mile or drivers can be home every other weekend for three days and earn a maximum starting pay of 61 cents per practical mile.

Barr-Nunn Transportation also offers an over-the road North fleet for those drivers living in West Virginia, Detroit, along with parts of Indiana, Wisconsin, and Iowa.  These drivers are home every 18 days for four full days and can earn a top starting rate of 62 cents per practical mile to start.

In addition to these starting rates all company drivers receive CSA safety bonuses of $725 or $550 every 90 days plus PTO (vacation) along with the money.  Over-the-road company drivers can earn over two weeks of PTO (vacation) in their first year with Barr-Nunn and they start receiving this PTO after 30 days.

Blue Cross Blue Shield Insurance, 401(k) matching program, extra pay per mile on shorter hauls and paid life insurance are added benefits at Barr-Nunn.

For more information about Barr-Nunn Transportation visit their website at www.barrnunntruckingjobs.com or call 888-999-7576.

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