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Carrier Transicold donates reefer unit to Nevada food bank

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Three Square Food Bank in Las Vegas was the recipient of a Supra 960 multi-temp truck refrigeration unit as part of Carrier Transicold’s program in support of the Feeding America network food banks. Shown are, left to right, Larry Scott, chief operating officer, Three Square Food Bank, Kelly Hunt, operations manager, CT Power, Las Vegas, and Tifani Walker, chief financial officer, Three Square Food Bank. (Courtesy: CARRIER TRANSICOLD)

LAS VEGAS — Carrier Transicold’s gift of a Supra 960 truck refrigeration unit to Three Square Food Bank in Southern Nevada is helping the hunger relief organization in its mission to provide wholesome food to hungry people, while passionately pursuing a hunger-free community.

The Supra 960 unit is Carrier Transicold’s highest-capacity single-temperature diesel-powered truck refrigeration unit and helps to ensure that perishable food stays fresher, longer.

The grant is funded in part by Carrier and its parent company, United Technologies Corp., to aid food banks within the Feeding America network.

Carrier Transicold is a part of Carrier, a global provider of innovative heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC), refrigeration, fire, security and building automation technologies.

“Carrier Transicold’s contribution is helping to make a real difference in the lives of hungry families and our neighbors in need,” said Brian Burton, president and chief executive officer, Three Square. “The value of the Supra unit is equal to the cost of more than 51,000 meals we serve to those who need them most, and we are incredibly grateful for this support.”

CT Power, a Carrier Transicold dealer located in North Las Vegas, handled the installation onto a 24-foot box truck.

“Three Square does a tremendous amount of good for the community, and we are so proud that CT Power has been able to help the organization in fulfilling its mission,” said Kelly Hunt, operations manager at CT Power. “This was definitely a great experience for us.”

Serving Clark, Nye, Lincoln and Esmeralda counties, with a service network of nearly 1,400 community partners and a fleet of 33 refrigerated trucks, Three Square collected and distributed more than 47 million pounds of food and grocery products in 2018, the equivalent of more than 39 million meals.

Since 2017, Carrier Transicold’s grant program in support of Feeding America’s network of food banks across the U.S. has funded $300,000 worth of equipment and installation of truck and trailer refrigeration units for individual food banks. Beyond Three Square in Nevada, the program has helped food banks serving parts of Arizona, Connecticut, New York, Pennsylvania, North Carolina, Florida, Louisiana, Michigan, South Dakota, Utah and California.

“Our cold-chain technologies help preserve, protect and deliver the world’s food supply,” said Jon Shaw, director, global communications & sustainability, Carrier Transicold & Refrigeration Systems. “In supporting Feeding America and its network members, such as Three Square, we are also helping to get nutritious and healthy perishable food to those most in need here in the United States.”

 

 

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Can you say oversized load!

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That is big!

 

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Diesel prices all but stagnant nationwide, less than 2-cent shift anywhere

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The average price for a gallon of diesel nationwide fell by 0.7 cents for the week ending July 22, to currently stand at $3.044 per gallon, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA).

The lack of movement in diesel prices continues a pattern that has been going on for the past month. On June 24, diesel was at 3.042, with changes of less than 1.5 cents every week in between.

Though tiny, the movement in diesel prices was nearly unanimous this past week, down in all but one region of the country.  That one exception was the Rocky Mountain region, where diesel rose 0.3 cents, to $2.978. Year-to-date, diesel prices are lower in every region, with the Rocky Mountain region again being the standout, having the greatest difference, 39.1 cents from this time last year.

California made it a clean sweep for lower diesel prices year-to-date with a drop of 1.3 cents this past week, to $3.939, still by far the highest in the country, but 0.4 cents below this time last year.

Along the rest of the West Coast, diesel dropped 1.1 cents to $3.198, bringing the overall West Coast average to $3.611 per gallon.

The average along the East Coast is currently $3.072, with prices highest in the Central Atlantic, where diesel is going for $3.259 after a 1.3-cent drop. Diesel is $3.122 in New England following a decrease of 0.9 cents over the past week, while in the Lower Atlantic region diesel slipped by 0.4 cents to stand at $2.937 per gallon.

That’s still slightly better than the Midwest, where diesel is going for $2.948 per gallon after a drop of 0.8 cents. Meanwhile, the Gulf Coast, the low-price leader in diesel, fell by the same 0.1 cent it gained the week before to stand at $2.804.

On Monday, increasing tensions between Iran and Western countries failed to produce a sharp reaction in the crude oil markets. Brent crude, the global benchmark, rose 98 cents, or 1.57%, to settle at $63.45 a barrel. U.S.-based West Texas Intermediate crude rose 59 cents, or 1.06%, to settle at $56.22 a barrel.

Click here for a complete list of average prices by region for the past three weeks.

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DOL opinion letter: Time in sleeper berth does not count as compensable time

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The Department of Labor says the time a truck driver spends in the sleeper berth is not compensable time. Pictured in the Peterbilt 579 UltraLoft sleeper berth. (Courtesy: PETERBILT MOTORS)

WASHINGTON — The U.S. Department of Labor said Monday said it had determined that time spent in the sleeper berth by professional truck drivers while otherwise relieved from duty does not count as compensable time.

The DOL issued the determination in a written opinion letter by the department’s Wage and Hour Division (WHD) on how a particular law applies in specific circumstances presented by the individual person or entity that requested the letter.

The American Trucking Associations lauded the opinion.

“ATA welcomes Monday’s opinion letter from DOL Wage and Hour Division Administrator Cheryl Stanton that concluded time spent by a commercial driver in the sleeper berth does not count as compensable hours under the federal Fair Labor Standards Act, unless the driver is actually performing work or on call,” said ATA President and CEO Chris Spear. “This opinion, which is consistent with decades-old DOL regulations, the weight of judicial authority, and the long understanding of the trucking industry, clears up confusion created by two recent court decisions that called the compensability of sleeper berth time into question.

Significantly, this opinion letter provides new guidance, the DOL said.

Under prior guidance, the DOL said WHD interpreted the relevant regulations to mean that while sleeping time may be excluded from hours worked where “adequate facilities” were furnished, only up to eight hours of sleeping time may be excluded in a trip 24 hours or longer, and no sleeping time may be excluded for trips under 24 hours.

“WHD has now concluded that this interpretation is unnecessarily burdensome for employers and instead adopts a straightforward reading of the plain language of the applicable regulation, under which the time drivers are relieved of all duties and permitted to sleep in a sleeper berth is presumptively non-working time that is not compensable,” the opinion letter said. “There may be circumstances, however, where a driver who retires to a sleeping berth is unable to use the time effectively for his or her own purposes. For example, a driver who is required to remain on call or do paperwork in the sleeping berth may be unable to effectively sleep or engage in personal activities; in such cases, the time is compensable hours worked.”

The ATA commended Acting Secretary Patrick Pizzella and Stanton for adopting a straightforward, plain-language reading of the law, rather than the burdensome alternative interpretation embraced by those outlier decisions.

“ATA also commends the department for making guidance like this available through opinion letters, which provide an opportunity for stakeholders to better understand their compliance obligations prospectively, rather than settling such matters only after the fact, through costly and wasteful litigation,” Spear said.

 

 

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